Strategy or Tapping into Anger?

Instructors in women’s self-defense courses often tell their trainees to tap into their “anger” when they are assaulted. This has always struck me as condescending and sexist as well as counter-productive. In trainings with primarily male participants, I’ve never heard anyone suggest that we rely on rage or any other strong emotion to counter-attack. Instead the emphasis is usually on reacting strategically.

Once a counter-attack is your safest option, a strategic mind-set serves you better than one hi-jacked by anger. Learning to see vulnerable, accessible targets and to use your natural and improvised weapons efficiently and effectively generally protects you better than rage.

Using intuition strategically is different from being fueled by anger when counter-attacking. Being able to access and react to your body sensations and your emotions, like disgust, fear, or unease, is important to increase your safety and to recognize, reduce, and avoid threats. But once you are at a point where you need to fight back, strategy will probably serve you better.

And in most encounters, it can be helpful to strive for “the cold face.” This is what the Mongols called a facial expression of a person who had mastered strategy and showed no emotion when dealing with aggression.

The Mongols


Self-Defense for Runners

Bridgers

Fall is a great time for running. Running is a great way to remain fit and healthy. Stay safe by using your common sense and your instincts. Read more…


Self-defense Training Starts Again in October

School is starting and there’s a hint of fall in the air. We had a great summer in Montana and abroad. Thank you to all of our trainees who joined us for our self-defense courses in May, June, and July. Everyone did such an awesome job throughout the summer, and in the final sessions, fighting off their padded aggressor.

Getting ready for fighting off the padded aggressor

Getting ready for fighting off the padded aggressor

After a busy August with lots of fun, including rafting, hiking, and Dragon Boat racing in Colorado and Inner Mongolia, Andy and I are now back in Montana, and Three Rivers Defense courses will start again in October.

Contact us to register for the fall weekly classes.

 


Situational Awareness – Self-Awareness

Our hearts go out to the people in France, and also to all of the other people suffering from recent terror attacks – from Orlando in the US to France, Belgium, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Somalia, and other countries.
Travel is a privilege that I treasure. I won’t be intimidated by terrorist attacks. But I will try to remain alert.
Of all self-defense skills, situational awareness, with the foundation of self-awareness, is still one of the most import skills. Not paranoia, but relaxed general awareness, allowing your body and brain to take in and process what’s going on around you. Self-awareness enables you to access and process your body’s sensations cognitively. Your body may react through a tensing of muscles, a “gut feeling,” or another visceral reaction. Meditation and other training can help you to connect your body and mind so that you can access these sometimes subconscious reactions for your protection.


Being paranoid and concentrating on specific things can distract you from other important input. You may be watching for the snake on the trail and miss the bear.


The Nice attack yesterday provided a sad example: the threat wasn’t an abandoned backpack with a bomb in it or a person dressed unusually for the weather, or some other more common indicator of a terror attack. The initial major weapon was the truck.


Relaxed general awareness is something you can improve through meditation and other mind-body training. 


Another self-defense skill is adaptability, overcoming your normalcy bias, accepting reality and moving away from danger as quickly and safely as you can.

Sometimes, people have no chance. But often attacks have pre-cursors, stages, dynamics, indicators that you may be able to sense. Situational awareness and self-awareness may give you the split seconds of reaction time to avoid getting hurt or killed.


Be safe this summer, at home and on your travels!


Self-Defense Training Schedule this Week

3 rivers defense
Our 6:00pm Wednesday class will meet tonight.
Based on the original schedule proposed by the group, the 2:15pm Thursday (7/7) class isn’t meeting this Thursday.
Everyone in the Thursday group who is not out of town is also welcome to join us at 6:00pm tonight (7/6).
We’ll have also have “Open Gym” this Thursday (7/7) from 9:00-10:00am. Everyone (Thursday and Wednesday class) is welcome to work on the bags or get some extra one-on-one time.
All Wednesday and Thursday group members are also invited to join us from 2:00 – 5:00pm on July 16th for a discussion on violence dynamics with a focus on non-stranger violence and for physical training. Please RSVP to Brigitte.
Have a great week!

Weekly Bozeman Montana Self-Defense Classes

Here is our Three Rivers Defense summer schedule.

Our Wednesday weekly self-defense class meets at our training facility at 612 W Griffin, Unit C, in Bozeman, Montana, on Wednesdays from 6pm – 7pm, June 1 through July 27.

We have started but you can still join this group. We have two spots left. There is also another group forming with people who can’t make the Wednesday 6pm class. This group meets on Thursdays from 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm, starting on June 9th. Call us if you are interested. 

No previous experience is required. Every new student will have the opportunity to learn some basics during a beginners’ class. This class is open to men and women, boys and girls, age 13 and up. Trainee numbers will be limited to keep it a small group class.

You’ll learn and practice self-defense through partner training, and you’ll get a workout through drills with targets, shields, and bags.

If you have taken a workshop or other classes with us before, this weekly class will allow you to practice what you learned or were introduced to.

In each class we’ll focus on one or two particular self-defense techniques, we’ll practice with exercises and drills, and we’ll end the session with free practice on the bags.

We’ll also offer private workshops by appointment throughout the summer.

Please register by email or call us at 406-580-5190.

Enjoy your Montana spring and summer! Be safe and have fun!


Next Bozeman Self Defense Workshop – May 18, 20, and 22, 2016

After a few weeks in Germany, Three Rivers Defense is back in Montana.

We are looking forward to our next self-defense workshop on May 18, 20, and 22, 2016 from 5:30 – 7:30pm each day. We will meet at our Bozeman training facility at 612 W Griffin, Unit C.

Please arrive a few minutes early so that we can begin on time.

Wear comfortable clothing and clean, inside gym shoes. If you prefer, you can also go barefoot. We’ll work out on mats.

Here are a few of the things that we’ll cover: boundary setting, releases from grabs and holds, and basic counter-attacks with your natural weapons.

You’ll practice striking with your hammer-fists, palm-heels, elbows, knees, shins, and feet and other counter-attack weapons.

You’ll also practice defending and counter-attacking from the ground.

We are looking forward to training with you next week!

 


Montana Human Trafficking Laws

3 rivers defense

45-5-701. Definitions. As used in this part, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Adult” means a person 18 years of age or older.
(2) “Coercion” means:
(a) the use or threat of force against, abduction of, serious harm to, or physical restraint of a person;
(b) the use of a plan, pattern, or statement with intent to cause a person to believe that failure to perform an act will result in the use of force against, abduction of, serious harm to, or physical restraint of a person;
(c) the abuse or threatened abuse of law or legal process;
(d) controlling or threatening to control a person’s access to any substance defined as a dangerous drug pursuant to Title 50, chapter 32, parts 1 and 2;
(e) the actual or threatened destruction or taking of a person’s identification document or other property;
(f) the use of debt bondage;
(g) the use of a person’s physical or mental impairment when the impairment has a substantial adverse effect on the person’s cognitive or volitional function; or
(h) the commission of civil or criminal fraud.
(3) “Commercial sexual activity” means sexual activity for which anything of value is given to, promised to, or received by a person.
(4) “Debt bondage” means inducing a person to provide:
(a) commercial sexual activity in payment toward or satisfaction of a real or purported debt; or
(b) labor or services in payment toward or satisfaction of a real or purported debt if:
(i) the reasonable value of the labor or services is not applied toward the liquidation of the debt; or
(ii) the length of the labor or services is not limited and the nature of the labor or services is not defined.
(5) “Human trafficking” means the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705.
(6) “Identification document” means a passport, driver’s license, immigration document, travel document, or other government-issued identification document, including a document issued by a foreign government.
(7) “Labor or services” means activity having economic value.
(8) “Serious harm” means physical or nonphysical harm, including psychological, economic, or reputational harm to a person that would compel a reasonable person of the same background and in the same circumstances to perform or continue to perform labor or services or sexual activity to avoid incurring the harm.
(9) “Sexual activity” means any sex act or simulated sex act intended to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person. The term includes a sexually explicit performance.
(10) “Sexually explicit performance” means a live, public, private, photographed, recorded, or videotaped act or simulated act intended to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person.

History: En. Sec. 1, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-702. Trafficking of persons. (1) A person commits the offense of trafficking of persons if the person purposely or knowingly:
(a) recruits, transports, transfers, harbors, receives, provides, obtains, isolates, maintains, or entices another person intending or knowing that the person will be subjected to involuntary servitude or sexual servitude; or
(b) benefits, financially or by receiving anything of value, from participation in a venture that has subjected another person to involuntary servitude or sexual servitude.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of trafficking of persons shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of trafficking of persons shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 50 years and may be fined not more than $100,000 if:
(i) the violation involves aggravated kidnapping, sexual intercourse without consent, or deliberate homicide; or
(ii) the victim was a child.

History: En. Sec. 2, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-703. Involuntary servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of involuntary servitude if the person purposely or knowingly uses coercion to compel another person to provide labor or services, unless the conduct is otherwise permissible under federal or state law.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of involuntary servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of involuntary servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 50 years and may be fined not more than $100,000 if:
(i) the violation involves aggravated kidnapping, sexual intercourse without consent, or deliberate homicide; or
(ii) the victim was a child.

History: En. Sec. 3, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-704. Sexual servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of sexual servitude if the person purposely or knowingly:
(a) uses coercion or deception to compel an adult to engage in commercial sexual activity; or
(b) recruits, transports, transfers, harbors, receives, provides, obtains by any means, isolates, entices, maintains, or makes available a child for the purpose of commercial sexual activity.
(2) It is not a defense in a prosecution under subsection (1)(b) that the child consented to engage in commercial sexual activity or that the defendant believed the child was an adult.
(3) (a) A person convicted of the offense of sexual servitude under subsection (1)(a) shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of sexual servitude under subsection (1)(b) shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 25 years and fined an amount not to exceed $75,000.

History: En. Sec. 4, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-705. Patronizing victim of sexual servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude if the person purposely or knowingly gives, agrees to give, or offers to give anything of value so that a person may engage in commercial sexual activity with:
(a) another person who the person knows is a victim of sexual servitude; or
(b) a child.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) If the individual patronized was a child, a person convicted of the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude, whether or not the person believed the child was an adult, shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 25 years and fined an amount not to exceed $75,000.

History: En. Sec. 5, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-706. Aggravating circumstance. (1) An aggravating circumstance during the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705 occurs when the defendant recruited, enticed, or obtained the victim of the offense from a shelter that serves runaway youth, foster children, homeless persons, or persons subjected to human trafficking, domestic violence, or sexual assault.
(2) If the trier of fact finds that an aggravating circumstance occurred during the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705, the defendant may be imprisoned for up to 5 years in addition to the period of imprisonment prescribed for the offense. An additional sentence prescribed by this section must run consecutively to the sentence provided for the underlying offense.

History: En. Sec. 6, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-707. Property subject to forfeiture — human trafficking. (1) (a) A person commits the offense of use or possession of property subject to criminal forfeiture for human trafficking if the person knowingly possesses, owns, uses, or attempts to use property that is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section. A person convicted of the offense of use or possession of property subject to criminal forfeiture shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term not to exceed 10 years.
(b) Property is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section if it is used or intended for use in violation of 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705.
(c) The following property is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section:
(i) money, raw materials, products, equipment, and other property of any kind;
(ii) property used or intended for use as a container for property enumerated in subsection (1)(c)(i);
(iii) except as provided in subsection (2), a conveyance, including an aircraft, vehicle, or vessel;
(iv) books, records, research products and materials, formulas, microfilm, tapes, and data;
(v) anything of value furnished or intended to be furnished in exchange for the provision of labor or services or commercial sexual activity and all proceeds traceable to the exchange;
(vi) negotiable instruments, securities, and weapons; and
(vii) personal property constituting or derived from proceeds obtained directly or indirectly from the provision of labor or services or commercial sexual activity.
(2) A conveyance is not subject to criminal forfeiture under this section unless the owner or other person in charge of the conveyance knowingly used the conveyance or knowingly consented to its use for the purposes described in subsection (1)(b).
(3) Criminal forfeiture under this section of property that is encumbered by a bona fide security interest is subject to that interest if the secured party did not use or consent to the use of the property for the purposes described in subsection (1)(b).
(4) Property subject to criminal forfeiture under this section may be seized under the following circumstances:
(a) A peace officer who has probable cause to make an arrest for a violation as described in subsection (1)(b) may seize a conveyance obtained with the proceeds of the violation or used to facilitate the violation and shall immediately deliver the conveyance to the peace officer’s law enforcement agency to be held as evidence until a criminal forfeiture is declared or release ordered.
(b) Property subject to criminal forfeiture under this section may be seized by a peace officer under a search warrant issued by a court having jurisdiction over the property.
(c) Seizure without a warrant may be made if:
(i) the seizure is incident to an arrest or a search under a search warrant issued for another purpose;
(ii) the property was the subject of a prior judgment in favor of the state in a criminal proceeding or a criminal forfeiture proceeding under the provisions of Title 44, chapter 12, or this section;
(iii) a peace officer has probable cause to believe that the property is directly or indirectly dangerous to health or safety; or
(iv) a peace officer has probable cause to believe that the property was used or is intended to be used under the circumstances described in subsection (1)(b).
(5) A forfeiture proceeding under subsection (1) must be commenced within 45 days of the seizure of the property involved.
(6) The procedure for forfeiture proceedings in Title 44, chapter 12, part 2, applies to property seized pursuant to this section.
(7) Upon conviction, the property subject to criminal forfeiture is forfeited to the state and proceeds from the sale of property seized under this section must be distributed to the holders of security interests who have presented proper proof of their claims up to the amount of their interests in the property. The remainder, if any, must be deposited in the crime victims compensation account provided for in 53-9-113.

History: En. Sec. 7, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-708. Past sexual behavior of victim. In a prosecution for an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705 or a civil action under 27-1-755, evidence concerning a specific instance of the victim’s past sexual behavior or reputation or opinion evidence of the victim’s past sexual behavior is inadmissible unless the evidence is admitted in accordance with 45-5-511(2) or offered by the prosecution to prove a pattern of human trafficking by the defendant.

History: En. Sec. 8, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

 

45-5-709. Immunity of child. (1) A person is not criminally liable or subject to proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, for prostitution, promoting prostitution, or other nonviolent offenses if the person was a child at the time of the offense and committed the offense as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking.
(2) A person who has engaged in commercial sexual activity is not criminally liable or subject to proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, for prostitution or promoting prostitution if the person was a child at the time of the offense.
(3) A child who under subsection (1) or (2) is not subject to criminal liability or proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, is presumed to be a youth in need of care under Title 41, chapter 3.
(4) This section does not apply in a prosecution under 45-5-601 or a proceeding under Title 41, chapter 5, for patronizing a prostitute.

History: En. Sec. 9, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-710. Affirmative defense. A person charged with prostitution, promoting prostitution, or another nonviolent offense committed as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking may assert an affirmative defense that the person is a victim of human trafficking.

History: En. Sec. 10, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month

Join the fight against human trafficking.

Inform yourself.

Check out our Anti Human Trafficking Resources


Human Trafficking Resources

Human Trafficking Resources

Montana Department of Justice

Montana Code Annotated 2015 on Human Trafficking 

National Human Trafficking Resource Center  Tel 1.888.373.7888

Survivors’ Guide to Leaving

Polaris Project

Online Training for Educators 

Human Trafficking in US Schools  (a resource for educators from the US Department of Education)

National Educators to Stop Trafficking (NEST)

Trafficking Resources for Law Enforcement

TIPS Report 2015

Human Trafficking Search Net

Shared Hope 

Not For Sale 

Trafficking Indicators

2014 Mansfield Conference Resources

National Domestic Violence Hotline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence 

National Sexual Assault Hotline,  RAINN, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

Dating Violence National Dating Abuse Helpline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-866-331-9474

Love is Respect

Runaway and Homeless Youth National Runaway Safeline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929)

Missing Children and Child Pornography National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-THE-LOST (843-5678)

Suicide National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Montana Anti-Trafficking Project