Strategy or Tapping into Anger?

Genghis Khan

Instructors in women’s self-defense courses often tell their trainees to tap into their “anger” when they are assaulted. This has always struck me as condescending and sexist as well as counter-productive. In trainings with primarily male participants, I’ve never heard anyone suggest that we rely on rage or any other strong emotion to counter-attack. Instead the emphasis is usually on reacting strategically.

Once a counter-attack is your safest option, a strategic mind-set serves you better than one hi-jacked by anger. Learning to see vulnerable, accessible targets and to use your natural and improvised weapons efficiently and effectively generally protects you better than rage.

Using intuition strategically is different from being fueled by anger when counter-attacking. Being able to access and react to your body sensations and your emotions, like disgust, fear, or unease, is important to increase your safety and to recognize, reduce, and avoid threats. But once you are at a point where you need to fight back, strategy will probably serve you better.

And in most encounters, it can be helpful to strive for “the cold face.” This is what the Mongols called a facial expression of a person who had mastered strategy and showed no emotion when dealing with aggression.

The Mongols


Domestic Violence – Self-Care

Orchids

Domestic Violence Awareness Month began with the first Day of Unity observed in October 1981 by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Read more…


Self-Defense for Runners

Bridgers

Fall is a great time for running. Running is a great way to remain fit and healthy. Stay safe by using your common sense and your instincts. Read more…


Why self-defense?

self-defense

Holistic violence prevention should include individual self-defense training.

As a lawyer, I advocated for systemic change to increase violence prevention for many years. I litigated cases for clients who had been beaten, threatened with shotguns, injected with drugs, and otherwise terrorized by their partners. Advocacy, litigation, and education are crucial, but holistic violence prevention also needs to include individual empowerment.

If you want to optimize your individual chances for avoidance and survival of violence, training in personal safety and self-defense is essential. Legal rights won’t protect you when someone tries to rape or assault you. Law enforcement officers generally appear on the scenes after the damage has been done. They enforce laws; they aren’t body guards. Prosecution, even if entirely successful, can serve to restore justice, but won’t undo the crime.

When I started my personal safety and self-defense school, I chose as its logo an imperfect circle with a Roman number three inside. The logo symbolizes several core principles.

The enzo, or imperfect circle, reminds me that the world, while beautiful, isn’t perfect. At some point, you may cross paths with a violent person who is capable of hurting or killing you. Violence is part of the world. No matter where we live. It’s not limited to predictable situations or places; it can erupt anywhere.

Violence can sprout from many different seedbeds. It may be calculated predatory aggression or it may explode from mental illness, emotional disturbance, alcohol or drug use, emotions such as rage or fear, and ego or status issues.

The enzo reminds me to see the beauty of the world, while being mindful of the potential for danger. It also symbolizes working towards a more just and humane world while realizing that we’ll never achieve perfection.

A substantial part of my work focuses on domestic and intimate partner violence. I worked in family law for a long time, and for the last five years,  I served on the board of directors of the Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. I also volunteer as a client advocate on a 24/7 crisis line for a domestic violence shelter. Domestic violence coalitions, and shelters generally work on violence prevention through primary prevention.

Primary prevention is sometimes defined as bringing about systemic change through addressing the root causes of violence, such as economic factors, gender-based discrimination, and rigid attitudes towards gender roles. Primary prevention is fundamental to affect change, yet it isn’t enough for people in acute violence situations for whom such change isn’t a reality yet. In the moments of an actual attack, people need tools to avoid victimization or to defend and survive.

Violence affects millions of people worldwide, taking many forms. It includes stalking, assaults, murder, intimate partner violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and rape, workplace harassment, campus violence, trafficking, sexual violence in the military, and sexual violence in prisons.Violence against women is considered one of the greatest challenges globally in anti-violence work. Violence against LGBT, trans-gender and gender-nonconforming people is ubiquitous.

Advocacy for a more perfect world, for systemic change towards a more just, peaceful, and humane world is absolutely necessary, and primary prevention is essential to accomplish meaningful systemic change. But training in individual personal safety and self-defense is also crucial to reduce harm and save lives.

Personal safety and self-defense training should be part of a holistic approach to violence prevention. Advocating for such training has nothing to do with victim blaming.

Giving people additional options to stay safe, to manage risk, and if necessary, to defend themselves, isn’t victim blaming. Rather, it empowers people with knowledge and prevention options – to be safer, to live happier lives, and to fight back if necessary to defend and survive. It honors people’s autonomy, encouraging them to enjoy the world on their terms.

 


Montana Human Trafficking Laws

3 rivers defense

45-5-701. Definitions. As used in this part, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Adult” means a person 18 years of age or older.
(2) “Coercion” means:
(a) the use or threat of force against, abduction of, serious harm to, or physical restraint of a person;
(b) the use of a plan, pattern, or statement with intent to cause a person to believe that failure to perform an act will result in the use of force against, abduction of, serious harm to, or physical restraint of a person;
(c) the abuse or threatened abuse of law or legal process;
(d) controlling or threatening to control a person’s access to any substance defined as a dangerous drug pursuant to Title 50, chapter 32, parts 1 and 2;
(e) the actual or threatened destruction or taking of a person’s identification document or other property;
(f) the use of debt bondage;
(g) the use of a person’s physical or mental impairment when the impairment has a substantial adverse effect on the person’s cognitive or volitional function; or
(h) the commission of civil or criminal fraud.
(3) “Commercial sexual activity” means sexual activity for which anything of value is given to, promised to, or received by a person.
(4) “Debt bondage” means inducing a person to provide:
(a) commercial sexual activity in payment toward or satisfaction of a real or purported debt; or
(b) labor or services in payment toward or satisfaction of a real or purported debt if:
(i) the reasonable value of the labor or services is not applied toward the liquidation of the debt; or
(ii) the length of the labor or services is not limited and the nature of the labor or services is not defined.
(5) “Human trafficking” means the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705.
(6) “Identification document” means a passport, driver’s license, immigration document, travel document, or other government-issued identification document, including a document issued by a foreign government.
(7) “Labor or services” means activity having economic value.
(8) “Serious harm” means physical or nonphysical harm, including psychological, economic, or reputational harm to a person that would compel a reasonable person of the same background and in the same circumstances to perform or continue to perform labor or services or sexual activity to avoid incurring the harm.
(9) “Sexual activity” means any sex act or simulated sex act intended to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person. The term includes a sexually explicit performance.
(10) “Sexually explicit performance” means a live, public, private, photographed, recorded, or videotaped act or simulated act intended to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person.

History: En. Sec. 1, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-702. Trafficking of persons. (1) A person commits the offense of trafficking of persons if the person purposely or knowingly:
(a) recruits, transports, transfers, harbors, receives, provides, obtains, isolates, maintains, or entices another person intending or knowing that the person will be subjected to involuntary servitude or sexual servitude; or
(b) benefits, financially or by receiving anything of value, from participation in a venture that has subjected another person to involuntary servitude or sexual servitude.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of trafficking of persons shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of trafficking of persons shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 50 years and may be fined not more than $100,000 if:
(i) the violation involves aggravated kidnapping, sexual intercourse without consent, or deliberate homicide; or
(ii) the victim was a child.

History: En. Sec. 2, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-703. Involuntary servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of involuntary servitude if the person purposely or knowingly uses coercion to compel another person to provide labor or services, unless the conduct is otherwise permissible under federal or state law.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of involuntary servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of involuntary servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 50 years and may be fined not more than $100,000 if:
(i) the violation involves aggravated kidnapping, sexual intercourse without consent, or deliberate homicide; or
(ii) the victim was a child.

History: En. Sec. 3, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-704. Sexual servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of sexual servitude if the person purposely or knowingly:
(a) uses coercion or deception to compel an adult to engage in commercial sexual activity; or
(b) recruits, transports, transfers, harbors, receives, provides, obtains by any means, isolates, entices, maintains, or makes available a child for the purpose of commercial sexual activity.
(2) It is not a defense in a prosecution under subsection (1)(b) that the child consented to engage in commercial sexual activity or that the defendant believed the child was an adult.
(3) (a) A person convicted of the offense of sexual servitude under subsection (1)(a) shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) A person convicted of the offense of sexual servitude under subsection (1)(b) shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 25 years and fined an amount not to exceed $75,000.

History: En. Sec. 4, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-705. Patronizing victim of sexual servitude. (1) A person commits the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude if the person purposely or knowingly gives, agrees to give, or offers to give anything of value so that a person may engage in commercial sexual activity with:
(a) another person who the person knows is a victim of sexual servitude; or
(b) a child.
(2) (a) Except as provided in subsection (2)(b), a person convicted of the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of 15 years, fined an amount not to exceed $50,000, or both.
(b) If the individual patronized was a child, a person convicted of the offense of patronizing a victim of sexual servitude, whether or not the person believed the child was an adult, shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not more than 25 years and fined an amount not to exceed $75,000.

History: En. Sec. 5, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-706. Aggravating circumstance. (1) An aggravating circumstance during the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705 occurs when the defendant recruited, enticed, or obtained the victim of the offense from a shelter that serves runaway youth, foster children, homeless persons, or persons subjected to human trafficking, domestic violence, or sexual assault.
(2) If the trier of fact finds that an aggravating circumstance occurred during the commission of an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705, the defendant may be imprisoned for up to 5 years in addition to the period of imprisonment prescribed for the offense. An additional sentence prescribed by this section must run consecutively to the sentence provided for the underlying offense.

History: En. Sec. 6, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-707. Property subject to forfeiture — human trafficking. (1) (a) A person commits the offense of use or possession of property subject to criminal forfeiture for human trafficking if the person knowingly possesses, owns, uses, or attempts to use property that is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section. A person convicted of the offense of use or possession of property subject to criminal forfeiture shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term not to exceed 10 years.
(b) Property is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section if it is used or intended for use in violation of 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705.
(c) The following property is subject to criminal forfeiture under this section:
(i) money, raw materials, products, equipment, and other property of any kind;
(ii) property used or intended for use as a container for property enumerated in subsection (1)(c)(i);
(iii) except as provided in subsection (2), a conveyance, including an aircraft, vehicle, or vessel;
(iv) books, records, research products and materials, formulas, microfilm, tapes, and data;
(v) anything of value furnished or intended to be furnished in exchange for the provision of labor or services or commercial sexual activity and all proceeds traceable to the exchange;
(vi) negotiable instruments, securities, and weapons; and
(vii) personal property constituting or derived from proceeds obtained directly or indirectly from the provision of labor or services or commercial sexual activity.
(2) A conveyance is not subject to criminal forfeiture under this section unless the owner or other person in charge of the conveyance knowingly used the conveyance or knowingly consented to its use for the purposes described in subsection (1)(b).
(3) Criminal forfeiture under this section of property that is encumbered by a bona fide security interest is subject to that interest if the secured party did not use or consent to the use of the property for the purposes described in subsection (1)(b).
(4) Property subject to criminal forfeiture under this section may be seized under the following circumstances:
(a) A peace officer who has probable cause to make an arrest for a violation as described in subsection (1)(b) may seize a conveyance obtained with the proceeds of the violation or used to facilitate the violation and shall immediately deliver the conveyance to the peace officer’s law enforcement agency to be held as evidence until a criminal forfeiture is declared or release ordered.
(b) Property subject to criminal forfeiture under this section may be seized by a peace officer under a search warrant issued by a court having jurisdiction over the property.
(c) Seizure without a warrant may be made if:
(i) the seizure is incident to an arrest or a search under a search warrant issued for another purpose;
(ii) the property was the subject of a prior judgment in favor of the state in a criminal proceeding or a criminal forfeiture proceeding under the provisions of Title 44, chapter 12, or this section;
(iii) a peace officer has probable cause to believe that the property is directly or indirectly dangerous to health or safety; or
(iv) a peace officer has probable cause to believe that the property was used or is intended to be used under the circumstances described in subsection (1)(b).
(5) A forfeiture proceeding under subsection (1) must be commenced within 45 days of the seizure of the property involved.
(6) The procedure for forfeiture proceedings in Title 44, chapter 12, part 2, applies to property seized pursuant to this section.
(7) Upon conviction, the property subject to criminal forfeiture is forfeited to the state and proceeds from the sale of property seized under this section must be distributed to the holders of security interests who have presented proper proof of their claims up to the amount of their interests in the property. The remainder, if any, must be deposited in the crime victims compensation account provided for in 53-9-113.

History: En. Sec. 7, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-708. Past sexual behavior of victim. In a prosecution for an offense under 45-5-70245-5-70345-5-704, or 45-5-705 or a civil action under 27-1-755, evidence concerning a specific instance of the victim’s past sexual behavior or reputation or opinion evidence of the victim’s past sexual behavior is inadmissible unless the evidence is admitted in accordance with 45-5-511(2) or offered by the prosecution to prove a pattern of human trafficking by the defendant.

History: En. Sec. 8, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

 

45-5-709. Immunity of child. (1) A person is not criminally liable or subject to proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, for prostitution, promoting prostitution, or other nonviolent offenses if the person was a child at the time of the offense and committed the offense as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking.
(2) A person who has engaged in commercial sexual activity is not criminally liable or subject to proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, for prostitution or promoting prostitution if the person was a child at the time of the offense.
(3) A child who under subsection (1) or (2) is not subject to criminal liability or proceedings under Title 41, chapter 5, is presumed to be a youth in need of care under Title 41, chapter 3.
(4) This section does not apply in a prosecution under 45-5-601 or a proceeding under Title 41, chapter 5, for patronizing a prostitute.

History: En. Sec. 9, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

45-5-710. Affirmative defense. A person charged with prostitution, promoting prostitution, or another nonviolent offense committed as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking may assert an affirmative defense that the person is a victim of human trafficking.

History: En. Sec. 10, Ch. 285, L. 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month

three rivers defense

Join the fight against human trafficking.

Inform yourself.

Check out our Anti Human Trafficking Resources


Human Trafficking Resources

three rivers defense

Human Trafficking Resources

Montana Department of Justice

Montana Code Annotated 2015 on Human Trafficking 

National Human Trafficking Resource Center  Tel 1.888.373.7888

Survivors’ Guide to Leaving

Polaris Project

Online Training for Educators 

Human Trafficking in US Schools  (a resource for educators from the US Department of Education)

National Educators to Stop Trafficking (NEST)

Trafficking Resources for Law Enforcement

TIPS Report 2015

Human Trafficking Search Net

Shared Hope 

Not For Sale 

Trafficking Indicators

2014 Mansfield Conference Resources

National Domestic Violence Hotline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence 

National Sexual Assault Hotline,  RAINN, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

Dating Violence National Dating Abuse Helpline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-866-331-9474

Love is Respect

Runaway and Homeless Youth National Runaway Safeline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929)

Missing Children and Child Pornography National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-THE-LOST (843-5678)

Suicide National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 24 hour Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Montana Anti-Trafficking Project


Bozeman Personal Safety and Self-Defense Workshops

3 rivers defense

Bozeman Personal Safety and Physical Self-Defense Workshops

WHAT: The focus of these workshops is on improving personal safety through learning and practicing physical self-defense skills and obtaining a basic knowledge of violence dynamics and prevention.

You will learn and practice setting and enforcing boundaries, using your natural weapons, including palm-heels, hammer-fists, elbows, knee strikes, kicks, stomps, releases from grabs and holds, defenses against strangulation attempts, and fighting back from the ground.

We emphasize training in a supportive, friendly, and fun environment.

Private small group training assures that each person will receive optimal individual training customized to the group’s needs and interests.

WHEN: By appointment. You or you and your group can select dates and times that best fit your schedules.

WHO: These workshop are for anyone who wants to learn and practice basic physical self-defense skills and/or gain a knowledge of violence dynamics and prevention. No previous knowledge, skill, or specific physical ability is required.

WHERE: 612 W Griffin, Unit C, Bozeman, next to Outa Ware, (behind the River’s Edge) just off North 7th in the new Great Northern Commercial buildings.

For more information or to register, please contact us.

FREE RETURN AND PRACTICE: Trainees will be able to return for free monthly self-defense refresher sessions at 5:30pm on the first Tuesday of each month.

The free Tuesday self-defense sessions are also open to everyone who attended previous trainings with Three Rivers Defense. We are looking forward to seeing you. The next refresher session will be on  Tuesday, December 8th, 2015 at 5:30pm.

 

 

 

 


Three Rivers Defense is moving to Bozeman, Montana

Hi - 5s after completing self defense course

612 W GriffinWe are moving our Three Rivers Defense home base back to Bozeman this fall.

Our new location will be at 612 West Griffin, Bozeman, just off North 7th. Construction of our new building should be completed by the end of September.

We’ll share our space with Outa Ware which will occupy the East portion of the building.

We are excited to start training at this convenient and central location.

Through the summer, we’ll continue to conduct our workshops at our participants’ and our hosting partners’ locations in Bozeman and elsewhere.

Take safety into your own hands and contact us to schedule a workshop for you or your group.


Don’t Ignore Violence Next Door

Niagara Falls

The recent bombings at the Boston Marathon and last year’s elementary school shooting in Connecticut have captured people’s attention. The media have inundated us with coverage about these horrendous acts of violence. People are outraged, to the extent that no-one wanted to provide a grave site for the dead Boston bomber.

Yet another type of violent criminal that lives in almost every community often escapes any repercussions or legal responsibility. Many people forget, ignore, or maybe aren’t even aware of  the violence that happens regularly in their neighborhoods. Read more…